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Japanese Books

10 volumes, 720 articles (or columns) Pages : - Edition : 0 - Type : pdf

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10 volumes, 720 articles (or columns) (Osamu Mizutani, Nobuko Mizutani)

Shared by Blue Galaxy on 2016-03-21

10 volumes, 720 articles (or columns) (1976-1992) The "Nihongo Notes" series of books are a compilation of "Japan Times" columns about the Japanese language that deal with specific conversations and situations; for example, how to start a business discussion, how to develop and conclude discussions, and how to make requests and criticize others. Examples of actual discussions, polite and informal, are included, as well as several examples of common [and often amusing] mistakes; but this is not just a common phrase book: each entry is given a two-page explanation of usage. Nihongo Notes 1 - Speaking and Living in Japan: This is a collection of 70 columns which first appeared in The Japan Times under the title of "Nihongo Notes" from August 1, 1976 to November 27, 1977, together with a list of common expressions used in daily life. These columns are designed to explain some points that are difficult for foreigners to understand but that, once explained, can help them understand the Japanese language better. Nihongo Notes 2 - Expressing Oneself in Japanese: This book is a compilation of the 70 columns which appeared in The Japan Times from December 3rd, 1977 to April 1st, 1979 under the title "Nihongo Notes". A section of polite conversational expressions has been added to supplement the columns. While continuing to deal with the actual usage of various Japanese expressions, the book attempts to provide more detailed explanations: specific situations such as how the Japanese start business discussion, how they develop and conclude discussions, and how they make requests and criticize others. Nihongo Notes 3 - Understanding Japanese Usage (70 columns from April 8, 1979 to August 3, 1980): The columns in this volume deal with such diverse aspects of Japanese usage as socially significant words and phrases, exchanges in professional situations, reserved-sounding speech, the speech of senior members towards younger members in a group, the speech of young people, and word play. Nihongo Notes 4 - Understanding Communication in Japanese (70 columns from August 10, 1980 to December 6, 1981): The columns in this volume deal with such diverse aspects of Japanese usage as expressions used at ceremonial occasions like wedding parties, expressions used to reinforce the feeling of belonging to the same group, expressions used for implicitly conveying one's requests, emphatic expressions of one's feelings, and important nonverbal expressions like bowing and knocking. Nihongo Notes 5 - Studying Japanese in Context (70 columns from December 13, 1981 to April 10, 1983): The columns in this volume include various expressions of reserve and consideration used toward the listener, and also several common mistakes that foreigners are apt to make. Nihongo Notes 6 - Situational Japanese 1 (74 columns from April 17, 1983 to September 9, 1984): While continuing to explain the actual usage of various Japanese expressions, we have changed the format slightly from this volume on to focus on how Japanese is used in specific situations and for specific purposes. In other words, we have shifted the emphasis from an expression-oriented approach to a situation-oriented one. Nihongo Notes 7 - Situational Japanese 2 (74 columns from September 16, 1984 to February 9, 1986): This volume explains, among other things, how the Japanese talk in familiar conversation, how men's and women's speech differ, how pronunciation changes in rapid speech, and how the topic is indicated in Japanese sentences. Nihongo Notes 8 - Situational Japanese 3 (74 columns from February 16, 1986 to July 19, 1987): This book explains how some basic words and phrases are used in social life, how the Japanese modify their speech depending on the purpose, and what expressions are most likely to precede certain categories of speech such as making a request, apologizing, stating an opinion, and reporting what another person has said. Nihongo Notes 9 - Situational Japanese 4 (74 columns from July 26, 1987 to December 18, 1988): This volume discusses how the Japanese express themselves for such purposes as making requests, asking about someone's intentions, offering explanation, showing goodwill, and criticizing others. The book also explains the subtle difference between two similar expressions and show how to foreigner can avoid making mistakes in using them. Nihongo Notes 10 - Situational Japanese 5 (74 columns from December 1988 to May 18, 1990): This book discusses, among other things, how the Japanese express themselves for such purposes as stating an opinion, thanking someone for some service, offering to do a favor, giving advice, and giving compliments. The book also explains the subtle difference between two similar expressions and show how to foreigner can avoid making mistakes in using them.

tags  Tags:  Japanese ,Japanese Culture 

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